State Gun Locking Devices

Locking Devices in Alabama

Posted on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Alabama law does not require a locking device to accompany the sale of a firearm, although federal law applies. Alabama also does not require firearm owners to lock their weapons.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Locking Devices in Alaska

Posted on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Alaska has no laws regarding locking devices for firearms, although federal law applies.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Locking Devices in Arizona

Posted on Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Arizona does not require that locking devices be included with each firearm sold, although federal law applies.

Arizona also does not require firearm owners to utilize locking devices. However, in order to be listed with Arizona’s child care resource and referral system, an unlicensed child care provider must separately store firearms and ammunition under lock and key or combination lock.1 State administrative regulations may also govern the storage of firearms in a number of other locations.

See our Locking Devices Policy Summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

  1. Ariz. Rev. Stat. §§ 41-1967(E)(7), 41-1967.01(I). []

Locking Devices in Arkansas

Posted on Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Arkansas does not require a locking device to accompany the sale of a firearm, and no state statutes require firearm owners to affirmatively lock their weapons.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Locking Devices in California

Posted on Monday, January 2nd, 2012

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

All firearms sold or transferred in California by a licensed dealer, including private transfers conducted by a dealer, must include a “firearms safety device” listed on the roster of approved firearms safety devices maintained by the California Department of Justice (“DOJ”).1 The firearms safety device must be listed on the roster as appropriate for that firearm.2 (A “firearms safety device” is a device, other than a gun safe, that locks and is designed to prevent children and unauthorized users from firing a firearm.3 The device may be installed on a firearm, be incorporated into the design of the firearm, or prevent access to the firearm.4) California prohibits anyone, including a licensed dealer, from keeping or exposing for commercial sale, offering, or selling any “firearms safety device” that is not listed on the DOJ roster, or that does not comply with the firearm safety device standards set by DOJ.5 In addition, no person may distribute, as part of an organized firearm safety program, any firearm safety device that is not listed on the DOJ roster or that does not comply with DOJ’s firearm safety device standards.6 The sale or transfer of a firearm does not need to include a firearms safety device, however, if the purchaser or transferee either: 1) provides proof that he or she has purchased or owns a gun safe that meets the gun safe standards set by DOJ; or 2) presents an approved firearms safety device to the dealer that the purchaser or transferee purchased no more than 30 days prior with the firearm.7

DOJ’s roster of approved firearms safety devices may only include firearms safety devices that have been tested by a DOJ-certified testing laboratory and that meet DOJ’s firearms safety device standards.8 DOJ may randomly retest roster samples to ensure compliance with the requirements of state law.9

Dealers selling long gun safes (locking containers designed to fully contain and secure a rifle or a shotgun that are not listed on DOJ’s roster of approved firearms safety devices10) that do not meet DOJ’s standards for gun safes must conspicuously post or display the following warning, in both English and Spanish, on the gun safe’s packaging or with any materials that accompany the safe, and on a label affixed to the front of the gun safe:

WARNING: This gun safe does not meet the safety standards for gun safes specified in California Penal Code Section 12088.2. It does not satisfy the requirements of Penal Code Section 12088.1, which mandates that all firearms sold in California be accompanied by a firearms safety device or proof of ownership, as required by law, of a gun safe that meets the Section 12088.2 minimum safety standards developed by the California Attorney General.11

California law prohibits any person from keeping, offering or exposing for commercial sale, or commercially selling a long gun safe that does not comply with DOJ’s standards for gun safes, unless the long gun safe is labeled in this manner.12

In addition, long gun safes must have a locking system consisting of either a mechanical combination lock or an electronic combination lock that has at least 1,000 possible unique combinations consisting of a minimum of three numbers, letters or symbols per combination.13

DOJ may order the recall and replacement of any gun safe or firearms safety device model that does not conform with its safety standards, or order that the gun safe or firearm safety device model be brought into conformity with those requirements.14

  1. Cal. Penal Code § 23635(a). []
  2. Id. []
  3. Cal. Penal Code § 16540. []
  4. Id. []
  5. Cal. Penal Code § 23660. []
  6. Cal. Penal Code § 23660. DOJ’s firearm safety device standards exist at Cal. Code Regs. tit. 11, § 4094. []
  7. Cal. Penal Code § 23635(b). Dealers must collect and maintain records demonstrating which exception applies. Id. DOJ’s standards for gun safes exist at Cal. Code Regs. tit. 11, § 4100. []
  8. Cal. Penal Code § 23655(d). By January 1, 2002, DOJ was required to set minimum safety standards for firearm safety devices and gun safes to significantly reduce the risk of firearms-related injuries to children 17 years of age and younger. Cal. Penal Code § 23650. A certified testing laboratory, after receiving a firearms safety device from the manufacturer, is required to test the device and submit a copy of the final test report to DOJ along with the device. Cal. Penal Code § 23655(c). DOJ must then notify the manufacturer or dealer of its receipt of the final test report and of DOJ’s determination as to whether the device tested may be sold in California. Id. DOJ’s regulations regarding certified firearms safety laboratories, firearms safety device testing and standards, and standards for gun safes are detailed in Cal. Code Regs. tit. 11, §§ 4080 – 4109. []
  9. DOJ may randomly retest roster samples obtained from sources other than the manufacturer to ensure compliance with the requirements of state law. Cal. Penal Code § 23655(f). []
  10. Cal. Penal Code § 16870. []
  11. Cal. Penal Code § 23635(d). []
  12. Cal. Penal Code §§ 23665-23670. Similarly, any person who keeps for commercial sale, offers or exposes for commercial sale, or commercially sells a long gun safe that does not comply with state standards for gun safes, and who removes the warning label required by Cal. Penal Code § 23635 is subject to penalty. Cal. Penal Code § 23665(b). []
  13. Cal. Penal Code § 16870. []
  14. Cal. Penal Code § 23680. If the firearms safety device can be separated and reattached to the firearm without damaging the firearm, the licensed dealer must immediately provide a conforming replacement as instructed by the Attorney General. Id. If the device cannot be separated from a firearm without damaging the firearm, the Attorney General may order the recall and replacement of the firearm. Id. []

Locking Devices in Colorado

Posted on Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Colorado law does not require a locking device to accompany the sale of a firearm, although federal law applies. Colorado also does not require firearm owners to lock their weapons.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

Locking Devices in Connecticut

Posted on Monday, January 2nd, 2012

In Connecticut, any person, firm or corporation engaging in the sale, other than at wholesale, of any handgun, must equip the handgun with a reusable trigger lock or gun locking device constructed of material sufficiently strong to prevent it from being easily disabled.1 The lock must also have a mechanism accessible by key or electronic or mechanical accessory specific to the device to prevent unauthorized removal.2 Federal law also applies. Handgun sellers must also provide the purchaser with a written warning stating that unlawful storage of a firearm may result in imprisonment or fine.3

State administrative regulations govern the storage of firearms in certain locations.

Connecticut does not require firearm owners to lock their weapons.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

  1. Id. []
  2. Conn. Gen. Stat. §§ 29-33(d), 29-37b. []
  3. Id. []

Locking Devices in Delaware

Posted on Friday, October 3rd, 2014

Delaware prohibits a parent, guardian or other person legally charged with the care or custody of a child less than 18 years old from knowingly, intentionally or with criminal negligence contributing to or failing to prevent the unlawful possession or purchase of a firearm by a juvenile.1 A defendant may raise as an “absolute” defense to charges for violation of this provision that he or she: 1) had a lock on the trigger of the firearm and did not tell or show the juvenile where the key to the trigger lock was kept; or 2) locked the firearm in a key or combination locked container and did not tell or show the juvenile where the key was kept or what the combination was.2

Delaware does not require a locking device to accompany the sale of a firearm, although federal law applies, and no state statutes require firearm owners to affirmatively lock their weapons.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

  1. Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, § 603. A juvenile is a person less than 18 years of age. Del. Code Ann. Del. Code Ann. tit. 1, § 701. []
  2. Del. Code Ann. tit. 11, § 603. []

Locking Devices in Florida

Posted on Monday, January 2nd, 2012

Florida does not require that a locking device accompany the sale or transfer of a firearm. Nevertheless, any person who stores or leaves a loaded firearm on premises under his or her control, and knows or reasonably should know that a person under age 16 is likely to gain access to the firearm without the lawful permission of the minor’s parent or without supervision required by law, must keep the firearm in a securely locked box or container or in a location which a reasonable person would believe to be secure, or secure the firearm with a trigger lock.1

Federal law also applies.

For additional information, see the Florida Child Access Prevention section.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

  1. Fla. Stat. § 790.174(1). Minor is defined as a person under age 16. Fla. Stat. § 790.174(3). See Fla. Stat. § 790.173 for background information about this law. []

Locking Devices in Georgia

Posted on Monday, January 2nd, 2012

In 2006, Georgia created the Suicide Prevention Program to be managed by the injury prevention section of the Division of Public Health of the Georgia Department of Human Resources. As part of that law, Georgia recognized that, “In Georgia, three out of four suicide deaths involve a firearm.” The law requires the injury prevention section to, among other things, “Work with public officials to improve firearm safety.”1

Nevertheless, Georgia law does not require a locking device to accompany the sale of a firearm (although the federal law applies). Georgia law also does not generally require firearm owners to lock their weapons. State administrative regulations may govern the secure control of firearms in certain locations.

See our Locking Devices policy summary for a comprehensive discussion of this issue.

  1. Ga. Code Ann. § 37-1-27 (formerly § 31-2-9). []